The need to have a firm enterprise mobility strategy and robust mobile solutions in place is more critical than ever. This means that all organizations must address their policies and make sure their approach is the right one — meaning that it aligns with business needs, organizational policies, culture, budget, IT and staff resources, and other considerations.

Today, CIOs and enterprise leaders are faced with deciding which mobile device strategy and infrastructure best suits their business:

  • Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)
  • Choose Your Own Device (CYOD)
  • Corporate Owned, Personally Enabled (COPE)
  • Corporate Owned, Business Only (COBO)

BYOD

Bring your own device (BYOD) is a popular approach. In fact, research from Gartner indicates that 90 percent of organizations around the globe will leverage BYOD (mainly due to BYOD being more successful for smaller businesses, which account for the majority of companies). In a BYOD system, employees use their own devices, choose their own carriers and are responsible for paying their own bills. In most cases, the company then reimburses the employee through a monthly stipend.

Benefits:

  • Higher employee satisfaction
  • Increased productivity
  • Little to no hardware costs

Drawbacks:

  • Security concerns
  • Compatibility issues
  • Stretched resources
  • Hidden Costs

COBO

The complete opposite of BYOD is a Corporate Owned Business Only (COBO) strategy. This gives the IT department and business complete control. An employee receives a company-owned and issued device for only company and work-related use. This completely removes the user’s ability to use one device for work and personal applications. This also takes control one step further from CYOD and COPE strategies (mentioned below), perhaps acknowledging their inability to keep personal and corporate data separate.

Benefits:

  • Complete security control
  • Operational efficiency
  • Cost savings
  • Complete control over corporate data

Drawbacks: 

  • Learning curve
  • Innovation
  • Low employee satisfaction

COPE

The flip side of COBO, Company Owned Personally Enabled (COPE), creates something of a compromise in which employees are supplied a phone chosen and paid for by the company primarily for business use, but allows for personal use such as voice calls, texting, personal email, and other applications. The company can decide how many choices and freedom employees get, which can be a powerful tool in supporting mobile expense management.

Benefits:

Drawbacks:

  • Corporate responsibility
  • Keeping on top of upgraded technology
  • User privacy
  • Employee satisfaction

CYOD

With IT departments struggling to support literally any device a user brought in a BYOD system, some companies have shifted to a more hybrid controlled approach called Choose Your Own Device (CYOD) which limits the user’s choices to those devices specified by the company. In some cases, specific models were made available for “power users” such as a sales team member or an executive. Others can be made available for people with fewer requirements. While efforts are made to provide multiple selections, this was far more limiting for the employee and far more manageable for the IT department.

Benefits:

  • Security control
  • Operational efficiency
  • Cost savings
  • Control over corporate data
  • Employee satisfaction

Drawbacks:

  • Corporate responsibility
  • Keeping on top of upgraded technology
  • User privacy

Conclusion

brightfin is the missing link when it comes to holistically managing all of your device management programs. brightfin helps manage any mobile program within ServiceNow, integrating all inventories and actions from all leading MDM/UEM providers. In conjunction with ServiceNow, brightfin creates a single, business-facing solution that brings together mobile expense, service, and asset management. brightfin’s mobile solutions transform the way cross-departmental work is managed, unlocking unbridled productivity, giving enterprises full control of their technology environment, and greatly decreasing technology provider expenses.